Federica Mantoan

Federica Mantoan holds a BA and an MA in Chinese Studies with a specialisation in Chinese Art and Material Culture and an MA in Design Cultures. At the LGC Federica works as a Coördinator in the framework of the research project "Art Against the Grain of 'Collective Sisyphus'. The Case of Allan Sekula's Ship of Fools/The Dockers' Museum".

Artist Talk: Martin Le Chevallier

Münster, the new film by Martin Le Chevallier (°1968, France), narrates the story of an Anabaptist community that has written history in the North-German city of Münster. They combined a revolutionary faith with a communist way of life avant la lettre. Alas, the dream would not last long… Martin Le Chevallier will explain his new work, which has its world premiere in Leuven. He will be joined in his lecture by Gert Gielis (postdoctoral researcher, FWO-Flanders), who will shed more light on the historical context of the Anabaptist movement.

Artist Talk & Debate: Adrien Tirtiaux

The artist Adrien Tirtiaux created his work Boven de Muur especially for the art itinerary of Tracing the Future. His art installation arises many interesting questions. To what extent are we willing to render private property open to the public? To what extent would we divide private property into common goods? Could we reach an ideal community by abandoning our individualistic way of dwelling, as described in More’s Utopia, or would this engender a reversed effect? Adrien Tirtiaux, Wouter Hillaert and Thomas Decreus will engage in a discussion with this subject matter.

Studies in Iconology: A book series by Barbara Baert

Studies in Iconology is a peer-reviewed series, published by Peeters Publishers and directed by prof. dr. Barbara Baert, member of our scientific board. Studies in Iconology accepts original and interdisciplinary contributions in the broader field of art theory and art history. The series addresses an audience that seeks to understand any aspect and any deeper meaning of the visual medium along the history of mankind in the fields of philosophy, art history, theology and cultural anthropology.

Allan Sekula: Mining Section

In mines and ports across the world, human labor sustains our industrial and globalized economies. Allan Sekula imagined and set out to realize an artwork, The Docker's Museum, which makes the struggles of miners, dockworkers, and seafarers visible through networks of metonymic objects that embody these workers' imaginaries. The collaborative notes gathered in this publication accompany the presentation of the "Mining Section (Bureau des mines)" of The Docker's Museum at the Anatomical Theater in Leuven in the Fall of 2016.

Stefanie De Winter

Stefanie De Winter first studied conservation of paintings at the Royal Academy of Antwerp, where she focused on conservation problems related to fluorescent paint layers. After a stint as a conservator in NYC, where she worked on contemporary American paintings (mostly Frank Stella), she went on to study Art History at the KUL, focusing on fluorescence in the work of Herb Aach and Frank Stella. She is currently FWO PhD fellow in Art History, working on the impact of fluorescent materials in New York art of the 60’s and 70’s.

Allan Sekula: Mining Section (Bureau des mines)

Please Join us on September 29, 2016 between 6 and 7:30 PM for an informal book launch event of Allan Sekula: Mining Section (Bureau des mines). Collaborative Notes. This publication accompanies the research presentation Allan Sekula: Mining Section (Bureau des mines) at the Anatomical Theater in Leuven, curated by Anja Isabel Schneider. It gives a provisional glimpse into Allan Sekula's compulsive collecting of more than 1200 objects for his last work: The Dockers' Museum, now part of the collection of M HKA, Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen

Tracing the Future

Is Thomas More’s Utopia still a source of inspiration for artists today? This project gives an often spectacular answer to this question. The exhibition showcases how artists today treat the concept of ‘utopia’ in their work. Faithful to Thomas More, they depict both the success and failure of the search for an ideal world.

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