Allan Sekula

Ship of Fools / The Dockers’ Museum is the project on which the US artist and writer Allan Sekula worked during the last three years of his life (2010–2013). The work consists, first, of a corpus of thirty-three framed photographs and two slide projections of in total over one hundred images, all made by the artist (Ship of Fools); second, it contains a gigantic collection of various objects, graphic images, postcards, and prints which the artist purchased, mostly online (The Dockers’ Museum).

Jan Dibbets

Dutchman Jan Dibbets ( b. 1941) is one of the principal artists to have introduced photography into the plastic arts, and this as early as the 1960s. At a time when photography has massively invaded contemporary art institutions—not without generating confusion and excess—it is not easy to evaluate the full radicality of Dibbets's approach. This radicalism has nothing to do with modernist overkill. Dibbets did not merely go further than others; rather, he simply went elsewhere.

Minor Aesthetics

Marcel Mariën (1920–1993) was a key figure of Belgian post-war Surrealism. He is widely acknowledged for his landmark work on Belgian Surrealism and his collaboration with future Situationists like Guy-Ernest Debord in his journal Les Lèvres nues. Nevertheless, Mariën’s texts, collages, photographs, film, and objects have to date remained understudied.

Aïm Deüelle Lüski and Horizontal Photography

This book is the product of a unique collaboration between Israeli artist and philosopher Aïm Deüelle Lüski and visual culture theorist Ariella Azoulay. In their longstanding working relationship, they research how to theorize the structure of the contemporary scopic regime and open a space for its civil transformation. On this occasion, Azoulay interprets a particular series of cameras built by Deüelle Lüski, along with photographs taken by these cameras.

Heterogeneous Objects

Heterogeneous Objects provides various essays that explore the encounter of photography with other media since the 1960s. The essays offer new ways of thinking about photography beyond modernist notions of medium specificity and autonomy based upon the idea that a photograph does not rely on a coherent system of codes but is almost always encountered as a fragmented, partial object.

In and Out of Brussels

In and Out of Brussels examines four Brussels-based artistic projects that converge in critically investigating the figuration of Africa in the image economy of the West: Herman Asselberghs's Speech Act (2011), Sven Augustijnen's Spectres (2011), Renzo Martens's Episode III - Enjoy Poverty (2009) and Els Opsomer's Building Stories #001 [That Distant Piece of Mine] (2013).

Minor Photography

The notion of the minor, developed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in Kafka, Towards a Minor Literature (1975), is introduced and connected here for the very first time to the field of photography theory. Deleuze and Guattari defined minor literature in terms of deterritorialization, politicization and collectivization. By transferring ‘the minor' to the medium of photography, this book enlarges the idea of ‘the minor' and opens it up to all kinds of mutations in the process.

Shifting Places

Since the late 1960s, Peter Downsbrough (1940) has been an important figure in contemporary art, associated with major international art movements such as minimal art, conceptual art, and visual poetry. In his artistic work, Peter Downsbrough explores various fields including sculpture, architecture, books, film, and photography.

The Art of Strip Photography

Photographic images can, apart from their capacity to show, convey an experience, a quality that has seldom been recognized. In this book the artist and photographer Maarten Vanvolsem explains how the strip technique can tell a different story of time and space in photographic images, a story that leads to new expressions and experiences of time and movement. The strip technique itself seems to be neglected in the debate on time and photography, although it has a long history. Its use is widespread and, especially in recent years, more and more artists rediscover the technique.

Time and Photography

Despite our stereotypical ideas on photographic images as snapshots (slices of time), photography is fundamentally a time-based medium. The relationships between photography and time are manifold: time can be directly represented within the image, it can be its theme and philosophical horizon, but it can also represent the global framework in which photographic practices develop and change through time.

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