Minor Photography

The notion of the minor, developed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in Kafka, Towards a Minor Literature (1975), is introduced and connected here for the very first time to the field of photography theory. Deleuze and Guattari defined minor literature in terms of deterritorialization, politicization and collectivization. By transferring ‘the minor' to the medium of photography, this book enlarges the idea of ‘the minor' and opens it up to all kinds of mutations in the process.

Shifting Places

Since the late 1960s, Peter Downsbrough (1940) has been an important figure in contemporary art, associated with major international art movements such as minimal art, conceptual art, and visual poetry. In his artistic work, Peter Downsbrough explores various fields including sculpture, architecture, books, film, and photography.

The Art of Strip Photography

Photographic images can, apart from their capacity to show, convey an experience, a quality that has seldom been recognized. In this book the artist and photographer Maarten Vanvolsem explains how the strip technique can tell a different story of time and space in photographic images, a story that leads to new expressions and experiences of time and movement. The strip technique itself seems to be neglected in the debate on time and photography, although it has a long history. Its use is widespread and, especially in recent years, more and more artists rediscover the technique.

Time and Photography

Despite our stereotypical ideas on photographic images as snapshots (slices of time), photography is fundamentally a time-based medium. The relationships between photography and time are manifold: time can be directly represented within the image, it can be its theme and philosophical horizon, but it can also represent the global framework in which photographic practices develop and change through time.

Situational Aesthetics

Highly influential both as an artist and as a theoretician Victor Burgin figures amongst the most insightful thinkers on visual culture in recent times. His writings focus on the production of meanings and affects through images – at the intersections of subjective desire and sociopolitical organization – and cross a diversity of representational practices (photography, film, painting, advertising, television, the internet) and theoretical fields (semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminist theory, cultural studies).

Fluid Flesh

How do we relate the body we have and the bodies we see to the mind, or to the soul? Fluid Flesh addresses the relationship between the body, religion, and the visual arts, which is one of both love and tension. Are we able (and allowed) to think of the divine in a corporeal way? Isn’t artistic expression, which originated from both the human mind and body, intrinsically a bodily matter.

Photography between Poetry and Politics

This book examines a recurrent question in recent literature on the use of the photographic medium in contemporary art. It is concerned with the multiformity of ways the photograph manifests itself in diverse artistic practices today, and with the consequences of this situation for photography’s critical potential. Central to this discussion is the question whether photography has a hybrid or chameleonic character because it can be part of entirely different mixed-media works of art.

Collective Inventions

Collective Inventions constitutes the first collection and book-length publication on Surrealism in Belgium on which Belgian and Anglo-American scholars have collaborated. Collective Inventions offers new writings by leading international scholars and experts on the movement's diverse manifestations in Belgium. The essays range from comparative analyses of Surrealism in Belgium with other versions of Surrealism, particularly French, to detailed critical engagements with individual oeuvres.

Critical Realism in Contemporary Art

What is the place of Critical Realism today, given the fact that both realism and commitment in art have become highly problematic notions since at least several decades? Realism in the first place appears to be relegated to the museum of pre-modern styles and devices, safely locked-up in the toolbox of 19th-Century art history. Secondly, in our cool, postmodern times, the place for commitment has become highly confuse. The naïve confusion between Critical Realism and notions like Social(ist) Realism or Political Correctness has complexified that situation.


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